Rich as a King

December 8, 2014 at 1:38 am (Reviews) (, , , , , , , , , )

image003Just last month, I wrote a book review for Money-fax.com on Rich as a King. It was a personal finance and investing guide written with a whole new twist: by using tactics of a Grandmaster Chess Player.

That review, of Susan Polgar and Douglas Goldstein’s book, can be found here: http://money-fax.com/money-fax-com-book-review-rich-as-a-king/

But I didn’t want my support of their venture to end there, and I wanted to reach out to my readers here as well.  If you’re looking for an educational gift to purchase this Christmas, wanting to set some new goals and resolutions for the New Year, or just want to get started in refining your mind – look no further, Rich as a King should be in your shopping cart.

From my Money-fax.com review:

Tips like “Keep your eye on the goal of gaining the initiative and keeping it,” are easily applied to both chess and the stock market. The authors will tell you how the idea is useful in chess and explain the importance of the concept, then show you how to continue utilizing this skill when you are dealing with your money. The connections are smooth and effortless, and reading tidbits from Polgar’s chess career and upbringing makes the read enjoyable. Polgar’s experience with goal setting is incredible and my favorite anecdote from her was in regards to her homeschooling and how she learned to focus.

If nothing else, check out this cool action shot of Susan playing 10 simultaneous chess games in Switzerland.  She’s pretty amazing.

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Freelance Writing

April 11, 2014 at 3:15 am (Education) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

RoyalPort30grnI wish this blog was a post about me receiving one of those… see Daphne, above, a royal portable from 1930.  Green, no less.

It’s not.

But it is pretty exciting.

I’m pursuing supplementing my income with freelance writing jobs.  So far, I have been hired on by Money-Fax.com and I’m enjoying it quite a bit.  Money-Fax has me writing about Kid & Family Budgeting, which is pretty perfect because I’m a homeschool mom chronically on an author budget.  (That’s code for mommy who lives off nothing.)

Here are links to my published articles, so far:

The Economics of Cloth Diapers

How to Entertain Your Child for Free This Summer

How Much Does it Really Cost to Homeschool

The more traffic my articles get, the more people will want to have me write them – naturally.  So, please, if you have someone in your life any of these articles would interest, share them.

There are more to come.  Keep checking Money-Fax.com for budget friendly pets and ways to celebrate Easter.  Browse through their site for other helpful articles as well.  They are an education service geared toward helping the public learn to improve the state of their finances.

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HPB Humble Book Club Meeting March 2013

March 6, 2013 at 8:32 pm (Education, Events, Reviews) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Lords of Finance Discussion Part Three (to read parts one and two, start here)

FinanceTitle: Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World

Author: Liaquat Ahamed

Publisher: Penguin

Genre: Economics/ History

Length: 508 pages

When all was said and done, Lords of Finance was a pleasant (and very meaty) read.  It was definitely nice wrapping up the completion of the book with a discussion at Half Price Books among customers turned friends.  The discussion definitely went down well with some home made German Chocolate Pie brought by a member.

DSC02708We sat together with internet research and a handy dandy chart of all the key players in Ahamed’s book and brought up our favorite quotes as well as bits and pieces that piqued our interest.

I was especially intrigued by the dialogue between Senator Mayfield and Senator Brookhart on pages 316-317 regarding Texas wanting to pass a bill prohibiting gambling via the stock market.  Apparently, there were a lot of hearings that went on “in an attempt to refine the distinction between investing and gambling.”  Upon reading this I immediately wanted to hash out the distinction and research the laws with others.  What a fascinating paper this would make for a young economics student to be assigned in order to both understand the inner workings of the stock market and to establish their own world view in terms of monetary ethics and morals.  Honestly, have you ever wondered… What is the line between gambling and investing? Off hand, I’m not sure I have a steadfast answer to give.  Do you?

At the meeting we talked about businesses that are publicly traded verses those that are not. We touched on Roosevelt and Hoover and what they had to deal with as presidents in comparison to what Obama is dealing with today, and over all what a relevant piece of history this book is.  One of my favorite quotes came very late in the book on pages 438-439:

When, in August 1932, a reporter for the Saturday Evening Post asked John Maynard Keynes if there had ever been anything like this before, he replied, “Yes. It was called the Dark Ages, and it lasted four hundred years.”

That line from Keynes about the Great Depression had me smitten with him.  When I got to the store, I immediately headed toward the economics section and picked out a book he wrote called The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money. He has other titles that I also plan to purchase one day.

It took us awhile to decide who would actually be purchasing the only title by Keynes in the store. Everyone, I think, likes to read titles mentioned in books they read and Ahamed mentioned Keynes work quite a bit. We are in agreement that the books (both Keynes’ and Ahamed’s) should be used as require reading for economics classes, both high school and college.  As someone who actively participates in continuing education on a self-study basis, I am interested to see how the end of this book leads into World War II.  So many financial agreements were made and unmade, I want to know in detail how things were handled during the war on a financial level.  None of us in the group were financial historian buffs and were unable to answer our own questions, but discovering the answers in the future should be exciting.

As for our reading future as a group, we tossed around ideas for the next set of books.  This isn’t quite set in stone just yet, but it’s looking like the HPB Humble Book Club reading schedule will look like this:

April: On Chesil Beach – Ian McEwan (we will probably also discuss Atonement)

May: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter – Carson McCullers

June: The Princess Bride – William Goldman (the online Half Price Books book club will also be discussing this book in June)

July: John Adams – David McCullough

August: The Color Purple – Alice Walker

Any changes to this tentative reading schedule will be made at the April meeting.

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