Banned Books Week

September 29, 2012 at 8:49 pm (Events) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

One of my favorite novels, Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf, is often challenged due to homosexual connotations between two female characters. This book is a favorite of mine because it is a book about one day, that can be read in one day, styled in the stream of consciousness. It is lovely, offers a lot of insight into the daily lives and unspoken thoughts of upper-class, post-war, England, and is devastatingly sad – one of those melancholy pieces I both enjoy reading and re-reading inside on a rainy day or outside in sunshine under a nice tree in Spring. The attraction between the ladies, I find, rather subtle, and easy to interpret in several ways. Basically, this book is not about being gay or not being gay, being good or bad, instead it is about being. Woolf, herself, was quite depressive and, I believe, struggled with identity issues. Mrs. Dalloway is, for the most part, the inner monologue of a woman trying to come to terms with who she is, who she was, and who she might have been.

Yet, people find the book itself and the material in it threatening. I, on the other hand, find it fascinating.

In the comments this week: share your favorite banned books with me.
Challenge this week: read a book from a banned or challenged book list.
Visit DeleteCensorship.org to view lists of banned books.

Articles about Banned Books:
NPR on Grapes of Wrath
The Lord of the Rings Controversy

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